SpaceX Rocket Blows Up On Pad – It’s Payload Was An Israeli Satellite

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and its commercial satellite payload were destroyed by an explosion at their launchpad in Florida early Thursday (Sept. 1) during a typically routine test.

The explosion occurred at 9:07 a.m. EDT (1307 GMT), as SpaceX was preparing to launch the Amos-6 communications satellite for the Israeli company Spacecom from a pad at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Saturday, Sept. 3.

At the time, SpaceX was conducting a static-fire engine test on the Falcon 9. Such tests, which typically precede each SpaceX launch, involve firing the Falcon 9 rocket’s first-stage engines while the booster remains secured to the launchpad.

“SpaceX can confirm that in preparation for today’s static fire, there was an anomaly on the pad resulting in the loss of the vehicle and its payload,” SpaceX representatives wrote in a statement. “Per standard procedure, the pad was clear, and there were no injuries.”

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and its commercial satellite payload were destroyed by an explosion at their launchpad in Florida early Thursday (Sept. 1) during a typically routine test.

The explosion occurred at 9:07 a.m. EDT (1307 GMT), as SpaceX was preparing to launch the Amos-6 communications satellite for the Israeli company Spacecom from a pad at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Saturday, Sept. 3. At the time, SpaceX was conducting a static-fire engine test on the Falcon 9. Such tests, which typically precede each SpaceX launch, involve firing the Falcon 9 rocket’s first-stage engines while the booster remains secured to the launchpad.

“SpaceX can confirm that in preparation for today’s static fire, there was an anomaly on the pad resulting in the loss of the vehicle and its payload,” SpaceX representatives wrote in a statement. “Per standard procedure, the pad was clear, and there were no injuries.” [SpaceX’s Falcon 9 Rocket Explained]

The Amos-6 communications satellite reportedly cost $195 million and was built for Spacecom by Israel Aerospace Industries to serve as a replacement for Spacecom’s Amos-2 satellite, which is expected end its mission this year. In October 2015, Facebook and the satellite communications company Eutelsat also announced a $95 million agreement to lease broadband capacity on the satellite from Spacecom, according to SpaceNews.

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